Test Bank for Illustrated Anatomy of the Head and Neck 5th Edition by Fehrenbach

Test Bank for Illustrated Anatomy of the Head and Neck 5th Edition by Fehrenbach

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By: Fehrenbach

Edition: 5th Edition

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Resource Type: Test bank

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Test Bank for Illustrated Anatomy of the Head and Neck 5th Edition by Fehrenbach

Chapter 03: Skeletal System

MULTIPLE CHOICE

  1. Which of the following bony features listed does NOT serve as an opening in bone?
a. Foramen
b. Canal
c. Sulcus
d. Fissure

ANS:  C

Feedback
A A foramen is a short windowlike opening in bone.
B A canal is a tubelike opening in bone.
C A sulcus is a shallow depression or groove on bony surface and NOT an opening in bone.
D A fissure is a narrow cleftlike opening in bone.

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 33               OBJ:   1 | 2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

  1. Which of the following bones listed is the ONLY movable bone of the skull?
a. Hyoid bone
b. Mandible
c. Palatine
d. Vomer

ANS:  B

Feedback
A Even though the hyoid bone is movable and has no bony articulations, it is a bone located in the neck and NOT the skull.
B The mandible is the only skull bone that moves; it moves at the temporomandibular joint. Within this joint, the mandibular condyle moves within the articular fossa of the temporal bone.
C The palatine bone may be a skull bone, but it does NOT move.
D The vomer may be a skull bone, but it does NOT move.

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 33               OBJ:   3

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

  1. The squamosal suture is BEST observed from which view of the skull?
a. Anterior view
b. Inferior view
c. Lateral view
d. Superior view

ANS:  C

Feedback
A It is difficult to see the squamosal suture on the lateral skull surface from an anterior view.
B It is difficult to see the squamosal suture on the lateral skull surface from an inferior view.
C The squamosal suture is the suture between the parietal bones and temporal bones on each side of the skull. This suture is BEST viewed from the lateral view.
D It is difficult to see the squamosal suture on the lateral skull surface from a superior view.

DIF:    Comprehension                               REF:   p. 40               OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

  1. Which of the following openings within the orbit connects the orbit with the cranial cavity?
a. Cribriform plate
b. Infraorbital foramen
c. Inferior orbital fissure
d. Superior orbital fissure

ANS:  D

Feedback
A The cribriform plate is a passageway for olfactory nerves from the nasal cavity to the brain.
B The infraorbital foramen is located inferior to the orbit on the facial surface of the maxilla.
C The inferior orbital fissure connects the orbit with both the infratemporal and pterygopalatine fossae and NOT the cranial cavity.
D The superior orbital fissure is a slitlike opening between the lesser and greater wings of the sphenoid bone and serves as a passageway for blood vessels and nerves from the cranial cavity into the orbit, thus connecting the two.

DIF:    Recall             REF:   pp. 46-47        OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

  1. After the seventh cranial nerve travels through the petrous part of the temporal bone, through which opening does it exit onto the face?
a. External auditory meatus
b. Jugular notch
c. Foramen spinosum
d. Stylomastoid foramen

ANS:  D

Feedback
A The external acoustic meatus is the short external canal that leads to the tympanic cavity.
B The jugular notch, formed by the articulation of temporal and occipital bones, is associated with the jugular vein and the ninth, tenth, and eleventh cranial nerves.
C The foramen spinosum is more posterior and is associated with the middle meningeal artery.
D The seventh cranial nerve enters the temporal bone through the internal acoustic meatus, travels within the temporal bone, and exits through the stylomastoid foramen onto the face.

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 46               OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

  1. Which of the following external foramina can ONLY be observed from an inferior view of the skull?
a. Hypoglossal canal
b. Foramen ovale
c. Foramen spinosum
d. Stylomastoid foramen

ANS:  D

Feedback
A The hypoglossal canal can be viewed from both inferior and superior aspects of the skull.
B The foramen ovale can be viewed from both inferior and superior aspects of the skull.
C The foramen spinosum can be viewed from both inferior and superior aspects of the skull.
D The stylomastoid foramen is NOT visible from a superior view of the skull and can ONLY be observed from an inferior view of the skull. It is located between the mastoid process and the styloid process on the inferior surface of the petrous part of the temporal bone.

DIF:    Comprehension                               REF:   p. 46               OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

  1. Through which of the following openings in the skull does the twelfth cranial nerve pass?
a. Internal acoustic meatus
b. Foramen rotundum
c. Foramen spinosum
d. Hypoglossal canal

ANS:  D

Feedback
A The internal acoustic meatus is located on the superior internal surface of the temporal bone and is associated with both the seventh and eighth cranial nerves.
B The foramen rotundum is located within the sphenoid bone and is associated with the maxillary nerve or second division of the fifth cranial nerve.
C The foramen spinosum is located within the sphenoid bone and is associated with the middle meningeal artery.
D The twelfth cranial nerve passes through the hypoglossal canal, an opening in the skull that is located in the occipital bone on each side of the foramen magnum.

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 47               OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

  1. Why is the pterygoid process of the sphenoid bone an important feature of the skull to the dental professionals?
a. Serves as an attachment for the muscles of mastication
b. Serves as an attachment for muscles involved in swallowing
c. Serves as a landmark observed on maxillary posterior periapical radiographs
d. Serves as a landmark observed on mandibular posterior periapical radiographs

ANS:  A

Feedback
A The pterygoid process is an attachment for both the lateral and medial pterygoid muscles, which are two muscles of mastication.
B The pterygoid process does NOT provide attachment for the muscles involved in swallowing.
C The pterygoid process is NOT a landmark usually observed on maxillary periapical radiographs.
D The pterygoid process is NOT a landmark observed on mandibular periapical radiographs.

DIF:    Application     REF:   p. 53               OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy | NBDHE, Provision of Clinical Dental Hygiene Services, 3.0 Planning and Managing Dental Hygiene Care

  1. Through which of the following bony landmarks is the sense of smell carried by olfactory nerves?
a. Crista galli of the ethmoid bone
b. Frontal sinuses of the frontal bone
c. Cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone
d. Perpendicular plate of the ethmoid bone

ANS:  C

Feedback
A The crista galli is the vertical projection of the ethmoid bone into the cranial cavity. It is an area of attachment for the meninges.
B The frontal sinuses of the frontal bone do NOT have openings for passage of the olfactory nerves to the brain.
C The cribriform plate is the superior horizontal part of the ethmoid bone that is perforated for passage of olfactory nerves for the sense of smell.
D The perpendicular plate of the ethmoid bone forms part of the nasal septum.

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 57               OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

  1. Which of the following bony features increases the surface area within the nasal cavity?
a. Perpendicular plate of the ethmoid bone
b. Inferior nasal conchae
c. Lacrimal bones
d. Nasal bones

ANS:  B

Feedback
A The vertical plate is straight and serves as part of the nasal septum.
B The scroll-like shape of the inferior nasal conchae assists in increasing the surface area since it is covered with mucous membranes.
C The lacrimal bones are small, fragile bones that form a part of the anterior medial wall of the orbit.
D The nasal bones form the bridge of the nose.

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 40               OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

  1. Which of the following skull bones are considered to be paired cranial bones?
a. Nasal bones
b. Temporal bones
c. Lacrimal bones
d. Zygomatic bones

ANS:  B

Feedback
A The nasal bones are paired facial bones but NOT cranial bones.
B The temporal bones are paired cranial bones.
C The lacrimal bones are paired facial bones but NOT cranial bones.
D The zygomatic bones are paired facial bones but NOT cranial bones.

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 47               OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

  1. Through which bony opening do BOTH the right and left nasopalatine nerves exit onto the palate?
a. Posterior superior alveolar foramina
b. Incisive foramen
c. Greater palatine foramina
d. Lesser palatine foramina

ANS:  B

Feedback
A The posterior superior alveolar foramina are passageways for the posterior superior alveolar nerves and blood vessels and NOT the nasopalatine nerves.
B Both the right and left nasopalatine nerves and blood vessels travel from the nasal cavity to the anterior palate through the incisive foramen.
C The greater palatine foramina are located in the posterolateral region of the palatine bones and are NOT passageways for the nasopalatine nerves and blood vessels but for the greater palatine nerve and blood vessels.
D The lesser palatine foramina are located in the palatine bones and are NOT passageways for the nasopalatine nerves nor blood vessels but for the lesser palatine nerve and blood vessels.

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 64               OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate an understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

  1. Which of the following landmarks needs to be noted during the administration of a local anesthetic agent to the maxillary posterior teeth?
a. Infraorbital foramen
b. Retromolar pad
c. Maxillary tuberosity
d. Zygomatic process of the maxilla

ANS:  C

Feedback
A The infraorbital foramen is located on the facial surface of the maxilla and is NOT a passageway for nerves to the maxillary posterior teeth.
B The retromolar pad is located on the mandible posterior to the mandibular molars and is NOT used as a landmark for the administration of maxillary local anesthesia.
C The posterior superior alveolar foramina serve as openings for the passage of the posterior superior alveolar nerve and blood vessels. These foramina are posterosuperior and medial to the maxillary tuberosity and perforate the infratemporal surface of the maxilla multiple times. They need to be noted during the administration of a local anesthetic agent to the maxillary posterior teeth.
D The zygomatic process of the maxilla does NOT serve as a landmark for the administration of local anesthesia to maxillary posterior teeth.

DIF:    Comprehension                               REF:   p. 63               OBJ:   3

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate an understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.2 Dental Anatomy

  1. Which of the following sutures of the skull is an immovable articulation between the occipital bone and the parietal bones?
a. Coronal suture
b. Lambdoidal suture
c. Sagittal suture
d. Squamosal suture

ANS:  B

Feedback
A The coronal suture is an immovable articulation between the frontal bone and the parietal bones.
B The lambdoidal suture is an immovable articulation between the occipital bone and the parietal bones meet.
C The sagittal suture is an immovable articulation between the two parietal bones.
D The squamosal suture is an immovable articulation between the temporal bones and parietal bones on each side.

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 40               OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate an understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

  1. Which of the following bony landmarks is a depression located between the coronoid process and the mandibular ramus?
a. Coronoid notch
b. Mandibular notch
c. Mandibular foramen
d. Submandibular fossa

ANS:  B

Feedback
A The coronoid notch is a depression located on the anterior border of the mandibular ramus inferior to the coronoid process.
B The depression between the coronoid process and the mandibular ramus is the mandibular notch.
C The mandibular foramen is located on the medial surface of the mandibular ramus.
D The submandibular fossa is a depression located inferior to the mylohyoid line or ridge on the medial surface of the body of the mandible.

DIF:    Recall             REF:   p. 68               OBJ:   2

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate an understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

  1. Which of the following paranasal sinuses can be palpated during an extraoral examination by a clinician?
a. Frontal and sphenoidal sinuses
b. Sphenoidal and ethmoidal sinuses
c. Ethmoidal and maxillary sinuses
d. Maxillary and frontal sinuses

ANS:  D

Feedback
A The frontal sinuses can be palpated during an extraoral examination, but the sphenoidal sinuses CANNOT be palpated as part of the extraoral examination due to their location within the sphenoid bone.
B NEITHER the sphenoidal NOR ethmoidal sinuses can be palpated during an extraoral examination due to their location within their respective bones.
C The ethmoidal sinuses CANNOT be palpated during the extraoral examination due to their location within the ethmoid bone.
D Both the maxillary and frontal sinuses can be palpated during an extraoral examination.

DIF:    Application     REF:   p. 71               OBJ:   3

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development | CDA: General Chairside, I. B. Preliminary Physical Examination | CDA: General Chairside, II. C. Describe how to perform and/or assist with intraoral procedures

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy | NBDHE, Provision of Clinical Dental Hygiene Services, 3.0 Planning and Managing Dental Hygiene Care

  1. How does the mandibular condyle move in relationship to the temporal bone?
a. Articular eminence
b. Coronoid notch
c. Articular fossa
d. Mandibular fossa

ANS:  C

Feedback
A The mandibular condyle does NOT move within the articular eminence of the temporal bone.
B The coronoid notch is part of the mandible.
C The articular fossa of the temporal bone is the articulation area for movement of the mandibular condyle as part of the temporomandibular joint.
D The mandibular notch is part of the mandible.

DIF:    Comprehension                               REF:   p. 71               OBJ:   3

TOP:   CDA: General Chairside, I. A. Demonstrate an understanding of basic oral and dental anatomy, physiology, and development

MSC:  NBDHE, Scientific Basis for Dental Hygiene Practice, 1.1.1 Head and Neck Anatomy

  1. When viewing the medial surface of the mandible, which of the following bony landmarks CANNOT be observed?
a. Internal oblique ridge
b. Genial tubercles
c. Mandibular foramen
d. Mental foramen

ANS:  D

Feedback
A The internal oblique ridge can be observed on the medial surface of the mandible.
B The genial tubercles can be observed on the medial surface of the mandible.
C The mandibular foramen can be observed on the medial surface of the mandibular ramus.
D When viewing the medial surface of the mandible, ALL of the other structures can be observed. The mental foramen is located on the lateral surface of the mandible and CANNOT be viewed on the medial surface of the mandible.

DIF:    Comprehension                               REF:   p. 68               OBJ:   3

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